Jan
20
2016

Winter Safety Message

Winter can be a beautiful time of the year, but it can also be a very dangerous time too. Here are a few tips to make this winter safe.

Driving in Snow:

Reliable transportation is especially important in the           winter. Not only should you keep your vehicle in top operating condition all year round – for safety and fuel economy, it is especially important to get it winterized to avoid any unpleasant or dangerous situations while traveling in frigid weather. Check the following:

Reliable transportation is especially important in the winter. Not only should you keep your vehicle in top operating condition all year round – for safety and fuel economy, it is especially important to get it winterized to avoid any unpleasant or dangerous situation while traveling in frigid weather. Check the following:

  • Ignition system
  • Fuel system
  • Belts
  • Fluid levels
  • Brakes
  • Exhaust system
  • Wiper blades and windshield washer fluid
  • Snow tires
  • Tire tread and pressure
  • Defroster
  • Proper grade oil
  • Cooling system
  • Battery
  • Lights
  • Antifreeze

Always fill the gasoline tank before a long trip or even for a short distance. Stop to fill-up long before the tank begins to run low. Keeping your tank as full as possible will minimize condensation, providing the maximum advantage in case of trouble.

A cellular phone can be very useful to you or another stranded motorist in case of an emergency.

  • Clear all windows and lights of frost and snow.
  • Drive with your headlights on.
  • Stock your car with basic winter driving equipment: A scraper and brush, small shovel, jumper cables, tow chain and a bag of sand or cat litter for tire traction. (See Winter car supplies below.)
  • Also include road flares, a blanket, heavy boots, warm clothing, and flashlight with batteries.
  • Remember to reverse the batteries in the case to avoid accidental switching, and burnout. Warm the batteries between your legs before using them.

Winter car supplies

Keep winter car supplies that can assist you in case of an emergency. You easily can equip your vehicle with essential gear for winter. Here’s what you’ll need:

  • Booster cables
  • Two or more blankets
  • Snow shovel and scraper
  • Flashlight and extra batteries
  • Extra clothing: cap, mittens, parka and overshoes or boots in case you have to walk for help.
  • High calorie, non-perishable food like candy and canned nuts.
  • Sand or strips of carpet for traction.
  • Extra windshield washer fluid and antifreeze
  • Flares or reflectors
  • Cloth/paper towels
  • Piece of bright cloth

Safe Winter Driving Tips

  • Clear snow and ice from all windows and lights – even the hood and roof- before driving
  • Leave plenty of room for stopping.
  • Pay attention don’t try to out drive the conditions. Remember the posted speed limits are for dry pavement.
  • Know the current road conditions. 
  • Bridge decks freeze first. Due to the difference in the exposure to air, the surface condition can be worse on a bridge than on the approach road.
  • Exit ramps are an even greater challenge during the winter since they may have received less anti-icing material than the main line. Be aware of this when exiting the highway.
  • Don’t use the “cruise control” option driving in wintry conditions. Even roads that appear clear can have sudden slippery spots and the slightest touch of your brakes to deactivate the cruise control can cause you to lose control of your vehicle.
  • Don’t get overconfident in your 4×4 vehicle. Remember that, if you are driving a four wheel drive vehicle, the vehicle may help you get going quicker but it won’t help you stop any quicker. Many 4×4 vehicles are heavier than passenger vehicles and actually may take longer to stop. Don’t get overconfident in your 4×4 vehicle’s traction.
  • Look further ahead in traffic than you normally do. Actions by cars and trucks will alert you quicker to problems and give you a split-second extra time to react safely.
  • Remember that trucks are heavier than cars. Trucks take longer to safely respond and come to a complete stop, so avoid cutting quickly in front of them.
  • Leave room for maintenance vehicles and plows – stay back at least 200 feet and don’t pass on the right. (See additional information below.)
  • Most importantly please remember to SLOW DOWN! Also, seat belts should be worn at all times – it’s the law.

Use Common Sense While Driving Near Plows

  • Remember that the road in front of the plow is usually in much worse condition than the roadway behind the plow. Plows will typically travel under 35 miles per hour and there is always a temptation to pass them. For your safety, it is recommended that you stay a safe distance behind the snowplows.
  • During plowing operations, visibility can be reduced by blowing snow and plow operators may need time to stop or move over to avoid stranded vehicles. Keeping a safe distance between your vehicle and the plow is very important in order to avoid accidents.
  • Allow plenty of room when passing a snowplow. Do not cut back into the lane ahead of the plow too quickly since the blade extends several feet ahead of the truck. Some snowplows are equipped with a “wing plow,” a 10-12 foot extension off the side of the truck. Be aware that the hazard exists.
  • When you see an approaching snow plow on an undivided roadway, move as far away from the center line as you safely can since blowing snow may obscure the actual width of the snowplow’s blade.
  • Turn on your lights- to see and be seen. Brush the snow off your headlights and taillights frequently.
  • Winter driving requires motorists to be careful and alert, but the most important tip for winter driving is: SLOW DOWN!

Click Link to learn about Space Heater safety

Click Link to see what supplies you need before the winter storm hits

Dec
30
2015

Pedestrian Safety

LANSDOWNE, Md. (Dec. 26, 2015) — Several members from Engines 5 and 362 along with Medic 365, joined forces to promote pedestrian safety on the corner of Bryant Ave. and Lansdowne Ave. Saturday morning. This was the location of a pedestrian involved accident earlier in the week.

Michael L. Sparks | Lansdowne VFD PIO

Dec
30
2015

More photos from today’s warehouse fire.

Engine 362, Engine 361, Medic 365 & Utility 369 were on scene at the 3300 blk. of Hollins Ferry Road (37-1) for a Warehouse Fire.

For more photos visit our Facebook page.

LFVD-MLS-123015-008

Picture 1 of 12

Dec
29
2015

Funeral for Charles “Mike” Mooney

Mike MooneyIt is with deep sadness and sorrow that we announce the passing of Life Member, Charlie “Mike” Mooney on Wednesday, 23 December, 2015.

Mike became a member of Lansdowne in January of 1949 and was highly respected. The effects of his loss are being felt already by those of us who had the honor and pleasure working with him.

Mike retired as the Deputy Chief of the Baltimore County Fire Department.

Family and friends are invited to gather at the Gary L. Kaufman Funeral Home at Meadowridge Memorial Park, Inc., 7250 Washington Boulevard, Elkridge, MD 21075 (exit 6 off Rt. 100) on Wednesday, 30 December from 3 to 5 pm and 7 to 9 pm where Funeral Services will be held on Thursday, December 31, 2015 at 10:00 am. If desired, memorial contributions may be made in his name to the Alzheimer’s Association.

For more information visit:  Funeral Home Website